Expected surge in Covid-19 cases post Diwali will not lead to shortage of beds in Mumbai

Expected surge in Covid-19 cases post Diwali will not lead to shortage of beds in Mumbai
With the Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC) expecting a spike in the number of Covid-19 cases post-Diwali; it has on the same time maintained that the possible spike post the competition should not pose a problem to the availability of Covid-19 beds in the city. From over 14,000 beds available in Covid-19 hospitals, 66% are vacant, BMC officers said. In categories like ICU, oxygen and ventilators the emptiness price is between 30-60%. The BMC has stated there will not be any influence on the mattress availability, and if want arises it will probably improve the mattress capability relying on the requirement. According to the info on BMC’s dashboard, of the 14,456 beds in devoted Covid-19 hospitals and centres, 9,580 beds had been vacant, as of November 14. In case of ICU beds, out of the overall 2,003 ICU beds, 803 can be found adopted by 5,987 oxygen beds of the overall 8,689 oxygen beds and 373 ventilators of 1,183 ventilators, are vacant. After the outbreak of the Covid-19 pandemic, BMC had come beneath criticism owing to non-availability of beds. To take care of the difficulty, the BMC beginning June 2020, created 24 mini managed ward struggle rooms to regulate the allocation of beds relatively than having a single centralized mattress allocation management room. Suresh Kakani, Additional Municipal Commissioner of BMC stated, “The 14 days cycle post-Diwali is crucial, and there may be a surge up to some extent. But bed availability will not be an issue and citizens don’t need to worry about it. However, they need to be cautious and take all precautions to control the spread of Covid-19.” The BMC had reserved 80% of the overall beds for Covid-19 in a number of chosen non-public hospitals and nursing houses. However, with the everyday caseload taking place a number of hospitals and nursing houses had requested to deliver down the cap and scale back Covid-19 beds, however the BMC has not allowed that but. The BMC had additionally determined to put a number of non-permanent Covid-19 centres on standby or shut them owing to the caseload taking place. But the state Covid-19 taskforce has warned in opposition to completely closing down such centres fearing a second wave. Meanwhile, Dr Kedar Toraskar, a member of Maharashtra’s Covid-19 job power stated, “We understand that daily operation of these centres can be a costly affair but we don’t have to shut them but should rather put them on standby wherein they can be activated anytime, in case of any spike in the coming days.” The state authorities had final week warned of a doable second wave in the month of January and February owing to unlocking of financial actions. There can be a college of thought that cases will improve in the course of the winter season.

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